Lead

Creating Momentum

How do you build momentum in an organization, business, or church? I was listening to a recent Andy Standley podcast where he addresses this topic. It was so good I had to jot it down mainly for my own learning. Please forgive the bullet point approach.

New things always trigger momentum.

Three words that are related to momentum: New. Improved. Improving.

We default to the theory that a new leader will bring about momentum. This is the easiest and quickest way to establish momentum. However, if there is a bad product, direction or system, a new leader won’t sustain momentum.

Before you look into hiring a new leader to build momentum, you need to ask the question: What are we not willing to quit doing?

What is it that is off-limits? The product, the direction?

We need to look at three variables before we assume what will build momentum? Is the problem the leader, program/product, or direction?

Momentum is never triggered by tweaking something old but by introducing something new.

Tweaking is

  • Less disruptive than the introduction of something new
  • Safer for a leader to risk
  • Less Expensive
  • Not as invasive to the organization

To continually improve does requiring tweaking. Evaluation and small changes are part of improving.

When you introduce something new, you will pay for it.

When you introduce and launch something new, you need to eliminate and let go of the mediocre.

Sometimes when you stop something and restart it, you are creating something new.

Momentum Killers

  • Disengaged Leadership
  • Distracted Leadership
  • Ego-Driven Leadership
  • Organizational Complexity
  • Overactive Management
  • Loss of Leadership Trust

There are seasons of momentum.

Three Questions to Gain and Sustain Momentum

  • What can we do that’s new to trigger momentum?
  • Is the new a significant improvement over the old?
  • What can we do continually to tweak the new so that it continues to gain and sustain momentum?